STOP-START TECHNOLOGY HAS BEEN USED IN EUROPEAN CARS DATING BACK TO THE 1980S, AND SOME SAY EVEN LONGER. 

 

How hard could it be to bring the technology to standard buses, right?

 

Cummins engineers Bill Cross and Bill Lamb (pictured at right) have had it in their own cars for years and both say that experience helped them as part of the Cummins team that brought stop-start technology to standard buses in 2015.

They point out, however, that starting and stopping a bus engine requires a lot more torque than an automobile engine. Also, a London bus makes up to 50 stops per hour. Over a 16-hour daily usage period, that comes to about 800 stops per day for a single bus, 5,000 stops per week and 20,000 stops per month.

 “The stops alone made by a standard bus without this technology really tests the engine over time,” said Cross, HMLD System Teams Technical Project Leader at Cummins’ Darlington Engine Plant in the United Kingdom. “When you are turning the engine off, then restarting it, the wear and tear is that much greater.”